History Of Gay Marriage Legalization Essay

Homosexual Marriage Should Be Legal Essay

1111 Words5 Pages

Homosexual marriage should be legal because marriage is a symbol of love and passion for one another, the homosexual family life is just as good as heterosexual family life, and prohibiting gay marriage is unconstitutional discrimination. Homosexuality occurs in over four hundred and fifty species, but homophobia (irrational fear or dislike against homosexuality) only occurs in one. (Gay Marriage Research Paper) We live in the “land of the free,” but we still have laws that ban marriage of homosexual couples. They need rights to get marries without outing labels on it like “civil union,” or “gay marriage.” (Gay Pursuasive Essay) Over thirty-eight percent of the United States population has the freedom to marry, or honors out of state…show more content…

Homosexual marriage should be legal because marriage is a symbol of love and passion for one another, the homosexual family life is just as good as heterosexual family life, and prohibiting gay marriage is unconstitutional discrimination. Homosexuality occurs in over four hundred and fifty species, but homophobia (irrational fear or dislike against homosexuality) only occurs in one. (Gay Marriage Research Paper) We live in the “land of the free,” but we still have laws that ban marriage of homosexual couples. They need rights to get marries without outing labels on it like “civil union,” or “gay marriage.” (Gay Pursuasive Essay) Over thirty-eight percent of the United States population has the freedom to marry, or honors out of state marriages of homosexual couples, also over forty-three percent of the United States population lives in a state that provides some form of protection for homosexual couples. There are seventeen states (not including Washington D.C.) in the Unites States that have the freedom to marry the same sex. Those states are; California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Washington D.C.. (Freedom To Marry)
Marriage should not be a union between a man and a woman, but it should be a union between two people who truly love and care for each other; and plan to spend the rest of their lives together. (Gay Marriage

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The early 2010s continued the state-level battles over gay marriage that defined the preceding decade, with at least one notable event. For the first time in the country’s history, voters (rather than judges or legislators) in Maine, Maryland, and Washington approved Constitutional amendments permitting same-sex marriage in 2012.

Same-sex marriage also became a federal issue again.

In 2010, Massachusetts, the first state to legalize gay marriage, found Section 3 of DOMA—the part of the 1996 law that defined marriage as a union between one man and one woman—to be unconstitutional. Foundations of the act had finally begun to crumble, but the real hammer fell with United States v. Windsor.

In 2007, New York lesbian couple Edith Windsor and Thea Spyer wed in Ontario, Canada. The State of New York recognized the residents’ marriage, but the federal government, thanks to DOMA, did not. When Spyer died in 2009, she left her estate to Windsor; since the couple’s marriage was not federally recognized, Windsor didn’t quality for tax exemption as a surviving spouse and the government imposed $363,000 in estate taxes.

Windsor sued the government in late 2010. A few months later, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced that the Barack Obama administration would no longer defend DOMA, leaving a representative of the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group of the House of Representatives to take on the case.

In 2012, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that DOMA violates the Constitution’s equal protection clause, and the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments for the case.

The following year, the court ruled in favor of Windsor, ultimately striking down Section 3 of DOMA.

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