Selected Essays Sir Francis Bacon

One of the major political figures of his time, Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626) served in the court of Elizabeth I and ultimately became Lord Chancellor under James I in 1617. A scholar, wit, lawyer and statesman, he wrote widely on politics, philosophy and science - declaring early in his career that 'I have taken all knowledge as my province'. In this, his most famous workOne of the major political figures of his time, Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626) served in the court of Elizabeth I and ultimately became Lord Chancellor under James I in 1617. A scholar, wit, lawyer and statesman, he wrote widely on politics, philosophy and science - declaring early in his career that 'I have taken all knowledge as my province'. In this, his most famous work, he considers a diverse range of subjects, such as death and marriage, ambition and atheism, in prose that is vibrant and rich in Renaissance learning. Bacon believed that rhetoric - the force of eloquence and persuasion - could lead the mind to the pure light of reason, and his own rhetorical genius is nowhere better expressed than in these vivid essays....more

Paperback, 288 pages

Published August 29th 1985 by Penguin Classics (first published 1597)

Publication date 2007-09-11

Topics essay, francis bacon, philosophy

Voltaire was an atheist. Diderot was Enlightened. But trite titles seldom encompass completely the beliefs of any individual. And this one fact is certainly true when dealing with Sir Francis Bacon.The youngest son of Sir Nicholas Bacon, Francis was born in Strand, London, on Jan. 22, 1561. He went to Trinity College at Cambridge. He was elected to Parliament; he was Queen's Counsel; he even became Attorney General before finally gaining the position of Lord Chancellor.But as do the careers of so many politicians, in 1621 his political career ended in disgrace.And yet, for all of this, both Diderot and Voltaire considered him "the father of modern science." Others consider him only the father of the "scientific method." (That process of collecting and organizing data.) Bacon's "The Essays," to which we now turn our attention, are--if they are nothing else--a delightful collection in decided disarray. That is, they seem to take no true progression. But an essay is not meant to be a treatise. And for all that, these essays are still a pleasure to read.Encompassing a broad field of interest, their largesse denotes the broad learning of this brilliant philosopher. It is therefore our sincere hope that the reader will, themselves, encompass these Essays. More importantly, we hope you enjoy them. (Summary by Carl Vonnoh, III)

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Reviewer:smmlit - favorite - January 27, 2013
Subject: Notions of latin

The reading of this book is spoiled by having no idea of latin pronunciation.

Reviewer: Purifier - favoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - May 16, 2009
Subject: Not Science

For what it is this is a good recording of Bacon. I downloaded it expecting it to discuss his scientific theories. Instead it is what I would call a book full of advice about everything from gardening to politics. If you want to learn about Bacon's scientific theory read the Novum Organum.

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